Common NDIS Terms

The NDIS can be very tricky to navigate. There are lots of different acronyms and terms used by NDIS and service providers making understanding the NDIS challenging. Here at Total Rehab Solutions, we have tried to help you with some of the most common.

NDIS- National Disability Insurance Scheme

NDIA- National Disability Insurance Agency

LAC- Local Area Coordinator

SC- Support Coordinator

AT- Assistive technology

SIL- Supported independent living

SDA- Specialist disability accommodation

Home Modifications (HM) - Home modifications are changes to the structure, layout, or fittings of a participant’s home so they can remain at home.

CMM- Complex home modifications: home modifications >$30,000

ECEI- Early Childhood Early Intervention- are appointed by the NDIA to assist families to understand the potential role of the NDIS and to guide them to other appropriate supports.

Service Agreements- A service agreement is a written agreement between you and your service provider that makes it clear what both parties have agreed to. It will typically outline what treatments will be performed and the costing, including travel and report costs

Funding Structures:

  1. Self-managed. Self-managing means the client will pay directly for the services provided, later seeking reimbursement from the NDIA. Being self-managed allows the patient to choose any provider, whether they are registered with the NDIS or not.
  2. Agency-managed [NDIA]. When the NDIA manages the patient's plan, the NDIS will directly pay our company directly through an online portal. Clients must choose registered NDIS providers if the NDIA manages your plan.
  3. Plan Management. In this situation, the NDIS will pay the participants Plan Manager, who will directly pay for all supports the client has asked them to manage. Plan managers are typically financial planners/accountants and are considered a third party debtor.

There are three types of support budgets that may be funded in your NDIS plan:

1. Core Supports Budget: assistance with daily living, consumables, transport,  and community participation. i.e. household cleaning or maintenance, low cost
assistive technology, support workers, taxi.

2. Capacity building: To build your independence and skills to help you reach your long term goals. I.e. support coordinator, home arrangements, recreational activities, training for employment or skills, exercise & diet (PT, EP, Dietician).

3. Capital support budget: include higher cost assistive technology, equipment, home modifications, vehicle modifications, and specialist disability
accommodation (SDA).

If you are wanting to someone to help navigate you through your NDIS plan, contact our team today!

 

Written by Physiotherapist Jacob Payne

Jacob graduated from Griffith University in 2016 with a Masters of Physiotherapy following a Bachelors's Degree in Exercise and Sports Science in 2014.

He has spent the majority of his career working in private practice and sports physiotherapy, developing particular interests in musculoskeletal, post-operative and neurological rehabilitation. Jacob is highly motivated to help each patient reach their desired goals.


The Sequential – Oral – Sensory (SOS) Approach to Feeding

Our expert dietitian Ricki-Lee provides her evidence-based, systematic desensitization program designed to overcome feeding difficulties.

Fussy Eating Prevalence

Despite the rise over the past four decades in obesity and mean BMI in children and adolescents (5-19 years) more children and adolescents are moderately or severely underweight than obese (192 million underweight vs. 124million obese). Studies suggest 25-33% of children struggle with some type of feeding and/or growth issue during the first 5-10 years of life. Only ~50% of children grow out of this pickiness. Children who have persistent feeding difficulties often go on to have significant delays in motor, language and behavior milestones at 18 and 30 months of age. Similarly, children with developmental issues will often present first with feeding problems.

There are many myths related to fussy eating, including that “If a child is hungry enough, they will eat”. 3-5% of children with feeding difficulties will “starve” themselves resulting in hospitalization or G-Tube placement. Another common myth is that fussy eaters have “behavioral” or “organic” problems. Studies show only 2.58% of children admitted for “behavioral” feeding problems, did NOT have an underlying medical issue that inferred with their feeding.  The truth is, eating is a multi-step progress, starting with a physical/organic aspects of the feeding task. Learning and environmental factors influence whether a child continues to and what they eat.

What is the SOS Approach?

The SOS approach is an evidenced based approached to assess and address all factors involved in feeding difficulties. The SOS approach believes that the “child is always right” and that their behaviors are a communication method to express feeding fears or difficulties. It applies systematic desensitization and “normal feeding development” to achieve sensory and oral-skills progression. The approach also focuses on parent education to allow general treatment strategies to be transferred into the home environment.

SOS therapy acknowledges that eating is not an easy process for some children. It works forwards the six major steps to eating (sight, interaction, smell, touch, taste, chewing & swallowing). It incorporates play with a purpose to increase the child’s confidence by exploring and learning about the different food properties.

The earlier the child begins SOS feeding therapy; the faster outcomes will be achieved. It is faster to correct a 2-year old’s relationship with food than a 12 year hold. Feeding therapy can make mealtimes easier for people of all ages, including adults.

What is involved?

Before your feeding assessment, you will forward you an in depth medical, developmental and feeding questionnaire. This needs to be received completed by the office 48 hours before your feeding assessment. The feeding assessment consists of 2 sections and will take place over 1.5hours.

The first phase is completed with the feeding therapist and parent where the questionnaire will be discussed in addition to an opportunity to discuss other concerns. Phase 2 is the visual feeding assessment with the child. Parents are requested to bring two foods of different consistencies the child WILL eat and two foods of different consistencies the child will NOT eat. This session is lead by the parent with the feeding therapist in observation. The feeding session is also recorded for discussion later.

After the conclusion of the feeding assessment, the feeding therapist will complete a comprehensive report detailing the findings. A follow up appointment is required with the parent to discuss and plan the child’s feeding therapy depending on the outcomes. Feeding therapy is completed in two formats; 1) individual and 2) small group. The feeding therapist will advise which is most suitable for your child depending on the outcomes.

Who benefits from SOS Therapy?

If the child has experienced any of the below they will likely benefit from SOS feeding therapy.

  • Ongoing poor weight gain (dropping percentiles on the growth charts)
  • Weight loss
  • Pre-term birth
  • Chronic or persistent choking, gagging, or coughing during meals
  • Chronic or persistent problems with vomiting
  • Has a birth defect or genetic disorder (ASD, ADHD, Anxiety Disorder, ADD, Cognitive delay, Down syndrome, Dyslexia, Emotional disorders, Fragile X syndrome, Learning disabilities, Sensory Processing Disorder, Sensory Integration Dysfunction, Tourette’s Syndrome)
  • One or more incident/s of nasal reflux (vomiting or spitting up out their nose)
  • Has been identified as having low muscle tone or a muscle disorder
  • Arches and/or cries at most meals
  • Did not achieve developmental milestones on time
  • Consumes less than 20 foods consistently.
  • Avoidance towards all foods in a specific texture (wet, squishy, crunchy, etc.) or nutrition group (meat, vegetables, starches, fruits, etc.)?
  • Preference towards ultra-processed or uniform foods (e.g. crisps, sausages, chicken nuggets, crustless toast)
  • Accepted foods are being dropped over time with no new foods being accepted
  • Periods of Naso-gastric feeding, Tube or PEG feeding OR other non-oral feeding methods
  • History of traumatic chocking incident and failure to return that food back into the diet
  • Unsuccessful transition to puree by 10 months
  • Unable to transition to solid foods by 12 months
  • Unable to transition from breast/bottle to a cup by 16 months
  • Continuation of baby foods by 16 months
  • Most meal times are described as a battle or fight to get child to feed
  • The child is disinterested in mealtime and foods presented.
  • The child is difficult for everyone to feed

If you are experiencing feeding problems, issues with weight- gain, or weight- loss, contact our dietitians to discuss how they can help you.

Written by Dietitian Ricki-lee Driver

Ricki-lee is passionate about supporting and empowering clients to achieve their health-related goals. Since graduating with an Honours in Nutrition and Dietetics from the University of the Sunshine Coast, Ricki-lee has obtained experience across a variety of sectors including private hospitals, aged care facilities, private practice, and specialist teams. Ricki-lee applies a patient-centred approach to enable clients to overcome health barriers and facilitate diet and lifestyle independence.  Ricki-lee has special interests in adult and childhood obesity, bariatrics and disability.

 

 


Optimising health at home

 

Every year more and more Australians are being diagnosed with long term illness or chronic disease. The most recent statistics provided by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare revealed that 1 in 2 Australians had 1 or more chronic conditions that need regular medical input. Unfortunately, recent articles have highlighted that people diagnosed with ongoing medical conditions are not seeking treatment due to recent the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 has caused a shift in our regular medical model, making it difficult to prioritise our health and wellbeing. Introduction of Telehealth services and inclusion of home healthcare has aimed to maintain optimal health and medical support to those most vulnerable during this tough time.

Recent access to health and medical practices has been challenging with closures, altered times and limit of person-to-person contact. Community spaces and events have changed drastically; seeing the closing of gyms and exercises classes, limitations of daily exercise durations and recreational activities. Individuals with chronic conditions are fearful of getting unwell after leaving their home and have been instructed to stay home as they are higher risk of mortality. They are unable to attend appointments and perform necessary exercise or rehabilitation. These changes have provided barriers to essential healthcare and adds layers of complexity to maintaining good health outcomes.

If good health practice is not maintained there will be a large increase in disease burden. We will begin to see a decline in health status, function and run the risk of deconditioning for our ageing and chronically ill populations.

It is during these dark times we have seen home healthcare practices like mobile rehabilitation or services like Telehealth flourish. These services allow providers and patients to continually interact whilst usual healthcare methods (clinic interactions) are put on hold. The obvious drawcard for mobile rehabilitation is that you don’t need to leave your home. A practitioner can come to your place and perform a consultation like what would normally occur in the clinical or rehabilitation setting. Education and advice, exercise prescription and treatment can all be provided. The same can be said for Telehealth.

Telehealth has gained huge traction since doctors have started using it recently. It allows you to consult a health or medical professional from your home over a phone, tablet or computer. Health practitioners can keep in regular contact to check up with you and perform necessary therapies if needed. Many applications like widely used PhysiApp can be used in conjunction and assist in running through your rehabilitation exercises.

Research has already shown a multitude of benefits for Telehealth and mobile rehabilitation services. Patients are reporting improved health outcomes, effectiveness for adherence to exercise programs, constant access to needed healthcare, cost saving and reduced effort. Home based healthcare can help maintain health status while keeping at risk individuals safe and mitigate anxiety and fear that might come with participating in the community.

With COVID 19 looking set to stay into the near future, home rehabilitation and Telehealth services have shown how effective they can be as a solution to providing healthcare. This might become the ‘new’ way consultations are performed to remove any challenges or complexities to accessing health services to maintain good health and wellness.

If you want to find out more about how telehealth or home visits could work for you, contact our team today!

 

Written by Physiotherapist Jacob Payne

Jacob graduated from Griffith University in 2016 with a Masters of Physiotherapy following a Bachelors Degree in Exercise and Sports Science in 2014.

He has spent the majority of his career working in private practice and sports physiotherapy, developing particular interests in musculoskeletal, post-operative and neurological rehabilitation. Jacob is highly motivated to help each patient reach their desired goals.

Jacob is available for home visits and telehealth consultations. 


Assistive Technology- How Our Occupational Therapists Can Help You!

Why do clients need an Occupational Therapist to assist with equipment prescription?

Time and again, I am required to assist new clients to acquire new replacement AT due to having been “sold” an incorrect and/or ill-fitting piece of AT.

Not all disability/medical suppliers are created equal!

Some have very experienced and knowledgeable staff and others…don’t.

Occupational Therapists are “functional” specialists.

We are trained to consider what is suitable for our clients now, to have a level of knowledge about what their prognosis looks like, and to be able to choose assistive technology that will be suitable and/or adaptable for our clients over the long-term, with consideration to anticipated deterioration or improvement in condition, and potential changes to living and care circumstances.

Some things that need to be considered for successful AT prescription are listed below:

  • Pressure area care
  • Type of fabric/stretch
  • Correct seat depth to reduce shearing
  • Structural material (foam, gel, air)
  • Immersion/Envelopment
  • Ability to transfer off cushions and/or mattresses
  • Adequate thigh and lower limb support for effective distribution of pressure
  • Modification/Adaptability
  • Growth of a child
  • Postural deformities
  • Changing mode of transfers with deterioration
  • Onset of incontinence
  • Adjustable seat height, depth, back rest, height of armrest and/or footrests
  • Swing away armrests and/or footrests for effective transfers
  • Incontinence
  • Type of material
  • Hygiene, ability to clean
  • Maintaining skin integrity
  • Cognition
  • Ability to successfully use assistive technology
  • AT suited to cognitive level
  • Ongoing ability to use prescribed assistive technology if deterioration is expected
  • Manual Handling
  • Method of transfers (current and future) e.g. step around, stand & pivot, slide board, hoist
  • Type of transfer e.g. independent/dependent, side or front access required
  • Postural Support Required
  • Does the client have fixed or flexible postural abnormalities?
  • Are lateral support required
  • Is extra seat support required to align the pelvis?
  • Does the client require tilt in space?
  • Mobile Shower Commodes
  • Type of seat required for pressure area care
  • Type of seat required for carer access (front, side or back access)
  • Is tilt in space required
  • Is postural support required (lateral supports, thigh guides, calf guides)
  • Is the seat height adjustable?
  • Does the client require swing back armrests and/or footrests?
  • Can the mobile shower commode fit over the current toilet?
  • Is there adequate clearance for tilt in space to be used
  • Environment
  • Is there adequate circulation space for the assistive technology to be used
  • Where will the assistive technology be stored?
  • Who is responsible for maintaining the assistive technology?

Please note that by no means is this an exhaustive list. I have not even considered wheelchair prescription in this list as it can be a very complex process that addresses all of the above and more. It is just to give an idea about the Occupational Therapist method of thinking and all of the things we are considering for our clients in order to achieve a successful prescription of Assistive Technologies. In relation to acquiring Complex Assistive Technologies under NDIS funding, we also must be able to provide clinical reasoning and justification that level 3 and 4 AT is a long-term (3-5 years) solution for participants.

Written by Occupational Therapist Casey Morrison

Casey graduated from the University of the Sunshine Coast with a Bachelor degree in Occupational Therapy (Honours). She is passionate about community care and enabling people to remain in their own homes for as long as possible, whilst maintaining safety and independence. A strong focus on safe mobility, reducing falls risks and home modifications enable Casey to help her clients reach this goal. Casey has a keen interest in pressure injury prevention, fatigue management, dementia, brain injury, and cognition rehabilitation. Casey studied Occupational Therapy as a mature aged student after running a successful business as a Personal Training and Massage Therapist. She prides herself on her holistic approach to healthcare which focuses on psychosocial wellness and collaboration with all care providers to ensure the best possible outcomes for her clients.

 

 

 

 

 


Complex Home Modifications- a timeline from our expert Occupational Therapist

 

The complex home modification process can be a daunting and convoluted process for clients. It takes multiple visits for an Occupational Therapist to gather all information required to ensure a successful long-term prescription. The NDIS tend to only fund complex home modifications once for each client, therefore extra care is required by the Occupational Therapist to consider current and future needs of the participants in all areas of the home. Even if a certain part of the home may not require modifications at present, the NDIS require it to be added into the submission and identified as a potential future need so that they can determine if the overall home modifications and expense recommended are considered Reasonable & Necessary.

Complex Home Modifications can take anywhere from 15 hours plus to be ready for submission.

As an example, I have detailed below an approximate timeline with hours of work required for a full bathroom modification:

  • Initial assessment required to identify functional capacity, prognosis and long-term needs. Complex Home Modification needs will be identified and may or may not be discussed depending on time

(Approximately 1.5 hours)

  • Write up initial Functional Capacity Evaluation report

(Between 2-3 hours depending on client complexity and need)

  • Home visit to discuss and plan for Complex Home Modifications with client and take photographs and measurements, sign builder Service Agreement for Joint Site Visit with builder

(Between 1-1.5 hours)

  • Occuapational Therapist draws up current and proposed bathroom floorplans
  • Send signed builder Service Agreement to Plan Manager for payment
  • Send completed bathroom floorplan drawings and Service Agreement to building company
  • Once building company receives payment, they contact the Occupational Therapist to organize a suitable day and time for a Joint Site Visit

 (Approximately 1.5 hours)

  • Conduct a Joint Site Visit with builder for client, Occupational Therapist and builder to collaborate and determine official modification plan

(1 hour)

  • Builder completes quotes and sends to Occupational Therapist
  • Occupational Therapist must seek out a second comparable quote for all jobs over $15,000
  • Occupational Therapist draws up final modification plans including wall elevations, specific location of fittings (e.g. grab rails, taps, light switches etc.)

(2 hours)

  • Occupational Therapist completes CHM report and any other supporting documentation required in readiness for NDIS submission

(3 hours)

  • Follow up visit with client to go over final plans and report and gain client’s approval and a signature

(1 hour)

  • Submission to the NDIS

The total for this job is 14.5 hours. There is usually extra time required for the builder and Occupational Therapist to liaise behind the scenes regarding specific fittings and placement of fixtures. And, as we all know, things do not always go to plan! People change their minds, or think of extra additions required along the way, so a bit of flexibility in time frames and workload must be provided.

Other considerations to take into account could be:

  • Requiring multiple joint site visits. For example, the need for a builder (bathroom mod) and a company delegate/equipment specialist (stair lift)
  • Extra assessment visits and Assistive Technology trials with the Occupational Therapist if new Assistive Technology is being acquired to determine suitability in the space proposed for modification

 

If you would like more information on home modifications, talk to our Occupational Therapists about how we can help you!

Written by Occupational Therapist Casey Morrison

Casey graduated from the University of the Sunshine Coast with a Bachelor degree in Occupational Therapy (Honours). She is passionate about community care and enabling people to remain in their own homes for as long as possible, whilst maintaining safety and independence. A strong focus on safe mobility, reducing falls risks and home modifications enable Casey to help her clients reach this goal. Casey has a keen interest in pressure injury prevention, fatigue management, dementia, brain injury, and cognition rehabilitation. Casey studied Occupational Therapy as a mature aged student after running a successful business as a Personal Training and Massage Therapist. She prides herself on her holistic approach to healthcare which focuses on psychosocial wellness and collaboration with all care providers to ensure the best possible outcomes for her clients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Three reasons to track your activity- tips from our expert Podiatrist!

Hey guys, Blake Withers here from Sports and Spinal and I’m here with a Podiatry point. I'll explain why tracking your exercise is important, even if you are not an elite runner or gym junkie.

Firstly, tracking is consistently recording your activity which will explain things like the frequency, intensity, and so forth.

  1. It’s a very important tool to use when discussing the prediction of an injury. For example, if you track consistently over a 3-month period and begin to notice a sore knee/foot or hip, looking back at your last 3 months may give a clue as to why that has occurred. There may have been a 2-week period where you didn’t do much activity, then after that was over you continued to do what you have always done – the body and soft tissue weren’t ready for the sudden return. A recent study from Germany concluded that even 2 weeks of activity is enough for the tissues within the body to reduce intolerance. If we add this to the stress of life, some shorter nights of sleep, we can see how an injury can occur. So, by tracking, it makes it a lot easier to identify, reflect, and make the appropriate changes.
  2. Your therapist will thank you and your management plan will be easier to understand and construct. If we can pull your data from your phone/watch or read what you have written, we can get a better understanding of the load you have subject your body to. We can also see if there has been a recent spike and thousands of other things. For example, if we know you run three clicks every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday around the same track which has hills (which we can see on most tracking apps) we can modify that easily and still keep you doing your activity without having to question how far you run. We can look at the graph, identify some areas to change and modify (plus we know the data is 100% correct) and start our management plan. Accompanying this with strength and conditioning and you can see how the plan can start to come to light.
  3. Motivation and planning your own training is easier– if you know exactly how much activity you are doing week to week or even month to month it makes it a lot easier for you to know how much you can increase or decrease or when you may need to have some time off. Plus its always motivating to look back and see how you are going with your training. An example I use is myself – recently coming back from a from an overuse foot injury I recorded each run and when I felt any discomfort (2km into a 3km run).  The week after I noticed I could then run 3km before I felt anything. Looking back and seeing my progression showed two things:
  • I was going in the right direction with my return to running program
  • I can now use that as a baseline for my next run.

Lastly quick tips: I always recommend Strava – free, easy to use, and works well with all phones. Another great feature is putting your shoes in as the equipment you use – that way you can see the Km’s you’ve done in them. A general rule of around 300-500km per shoe.

If you are experiencing any issues with your orthotics or wanting footwear advice, contact our podiatrists to discuss how they can help you.

 

Written by Podiatrist Blake Withers

Blake graduated with a Bachelor of Podiatry from the University of Newcastle. He has always held a deep interest in health, fitness and the human body leading him towards his chosen profession of podiatry. He continually expands his knowledge and skills to keep up to date with the latest science behind lower limb conditions and injuries.

Blake enjoys all aspects of podiatric care but holds a special interest in sports and biomechanical podiatry (including paediatric patients). The most important thing for Blake is helping his patients achieve their goals.

In his spare time, Blake enjoys the outdoors and many sports including Rugby League, surfing, running and CrossFit.

Blake is available for Podiatry appointments at our Sippy DownsRedcliffeNorth LakesMaroochydore and Nambour Locations.

 

 

 

 


Are you suffering from headaches & migraines? Find out how our Physiotherapists can help!

 

Have you ever woken up with a splitting headache that does not seem to shift? Feeling hopeless and unable to think clearly? You are not alone. 50% of people will suffer from headaches in a given year and 90% will suffer headaches in their lifetime.

They can affect everyone very differently with some only experiencing a mild ache at the back of the head and some suffering debilitating pain with associated symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound. Nearly all of those with migraines and about 60% of those with tension type headaches will experience reductions in social activity and work capacity.

Headaches and migraines can have many triggers or driving factors. One thing they all have in common is, when you are having an episode there is increased nervous system activity in the brainstem (specifically the Trigemino-Cervical Complex or TCC). Understanding this is key to understanding the various management strategies of headaches and migraines.

The TCC has nerve fibres connecting to it that come from the upper three joints of the neck, the TMJ (Jaw Joint), the head and face. Due to this amazing convergence of nerves, a stimulus in one or more of these areas can contribute to sensitivity amongst all of them.

You can think of your headache or migraine-like a bucket of water and when that bucket overflows you get a headache. If there is pain, stiffness or dysfunction coming from the upper neck joints, the jaw, the head, or face this will start to fill the bucket up. So when there is increased tension or stiffness in the neck, you are more likely to overflow the bucket and get a headache. If you have jaw joint stiffness, pain, or even have had recent dental work performed, this can also lead to increased information heading toward the TCC, further filling up the bucket.

On the other hand, some systemic factors can reduce the size of the bucket. For example, if you are stressed, anxious, experiencing poor sleep, smoke or have a poor diet, these can all increase your nervous system sensitivity, therefore reducing the size of the bucket. This means it does not take as much to fill up the bucket and you may find yourself more prone to experiencing migraines and headaches. There are other rare medical conditions that could be the primary cause of the migraine or headache and your GP, a Neurologist and your health care team should be able to identify these if that is the case.

The positive aspect of having so many contributing factors is that this means there is a range of treatments that could be utilised. These health practitioners could all have something to add:

  • Physiotherapist: Can treat the cervical spine, the jaw or other contributing musculoskeletal issues
  • Dentist: Can treat the jaw and bite (if you clench or grind the teeth)
  • Dietitian: Can help you optimise your diet which can help with sleep, weight management, inflammation, and wellbeing
  • Psychologist: Can help you if you are feeling stressed, anxious or depressed
  • Neurologist: If you experience persistent or severe headaches, a Neurologist can help diagnose more complex causes or suggest a range of treatments such as medication or botox injections to reduce the tone in the muscles and block chemicals called neurotransmitters that carry signals from your brain that are perceived as pain.

If you would like more information and guidance, talk to our Physiotherapists or Dietitians for advice about how to best plan the management of your headaches or migraines.

 

Written by Shoulder, Neck and Headache Physiotherapist Adam Horwitz

Adam graduated from The University of Sydney with an applied science degree in Exercise and Sports Science followed by a Masters of Physiotherapy. He has undergone further training in Western Acupuncture and Dry Needling as well as attended a range of courses for the management of shoulder pain, headaches, TMJ Disorders (Jaw Joint) and spinal pathologies.

Adam developed a keen interest in Physiotherapy and injury management through competing in Football, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Squash over the years. He uses a variety of techniques to help diagnose and treat his client’s injuries. His effective treatment planning includes easy to understand advice and education, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilisations and exercise prescription.

His inpatient hospital training gave him an in-depth knowledge of medical management of a variety of conditions and the effect hospitalisation can have on the body after discharge. Adam is fortunate to have worked with some of the leading hip, knee, shoulder and spinal specialists in the country. He is well experienced rehabilitating patients following joint replacements, including; Total Knee Replacements, Total Hip Replacements and Total Shoulder Replacements.

Through further training in Pilates and his involvement with Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Adam has a deep understanding of human movement, biomechanics and how to use exercise to stimulate adaptation and recovery.

Adam is available for Physiotherapy appointments at our Chermside location.


Should I exercise If I'm Sick? Advice From Our Exercise Physiologist

With winter being well and truly upon us, as an exercise physiologist, I regularly get asked If you should still exercise if you feel yourself getting sick or if you're just not feeling great.

Should you push on with your normal exercise load in the hope it might help your immune system shake off the illness? Or will that stress your body and make it worse?

As a general rule of thumb, it is okay to continue exercising when sick.  Exercise can be modified to reduce the intensity and length of your activity to ensure you don't miss a workout e.g walking instead of running or bodyweight training instead of a heavy weights session. With winter in full swing and seeing an increase in common colds/bugs, it's best to avoid exercise if your symptoms are chest down e.g you have a fever, feel high levels of fatigue or you are experiencing widespread muscle aches. If you are feeling run down or under the weather, avoid group exercise to ensure you are not passing on bugs to vulnerable clients and your trainer. 

Exercise is a great tool for strengthening your immune system, however, you don't want to overload. Remember to stay hydrated, prioritise sleep, and alter your training load until you're back to 100%. Your Exercise Physiologist will be able to manage/alter your exercise workload and help you attain your goals after a well-needed rest.

If you need guidance with exercise or wanting a specific exercise program tailored to your injuries, health status and goals, contact our exercise physiologists to discuss how they can help you.

Written by Exercise Physiologist Lauren Sexton

Lauren graduated from the University Of The Sunshine Coast completing a Bachelor of Clinical Exercise Science. Predominately working in private practice since graduating, Lauren has developed a clinical interest in geriatrics, weight loss/chronic disease management and injury prevention/rehabilitation.

As well as working in clinical settings, Lauren has also had experience in education (Certificate III and IV in fitness), clinical Pilates, sports performance enhancement (soccer) and sports training.

Lauren is driven by patients achieving their personal goals, returning to enjoyable activities and modifying the risk of morbidity to lead a healthier and happier lifestyle.

Lauren is available for Exercise Physiology appointments at our Woolloongabba location.

 

 

 


Healthy Recipe From A Dietitian: Gut-Loving Minestrone Soup

Want an easy to make winter warmer? Look no further. 🥰👩🏼‍🍳

It’s getting a little chilly and I have jumped at the opportunity to make my favourite, gut-loving soup, Minestrone! These bowls have 16 different plant foods! Adding a soup mix like this one is a great way to boost the fiber and plant protein content of your meals! 🌿🌱

The largest international gut study published in 2018 found that people who consume upwards of 30 different plant foods per week had greater gut microbe diversity! 👩🏼‍🔬🦠

Here’s the recipe:
1 cup Italian Soup Mix
3 cups water
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
½ brown onion, sliced
1 tsp crushed garlic
1 carrot, diced
1 small potato, diced
½ zucchini, diced
100g frozen spinach
1 tbsp tomato paste
3 cups water
1 stock cube
½ tsp oregano
Pinch of basil
Pinch of parmesan

1. Prepare the soup mix as per packet instructions.
In a medium saucepan add the olive oil, garlic and onion. Once translucent, add the potato, carrot, tomato paste, stock and water. Cook for 10 minutes.
2. Add the spinach, zucchini and season with oregano. Cook for another 10-15 minutes.
3. Once ready to serve, dish into bowls and top with parmesan cheese and basil 🧀🌱. Voilà!!

The best part about minestrone is that you can use almost any veggies you have that are looking a little sad in the crisper! 🥴🍆🍅🥕🌽

Written by Dietitian Chelsea McCallum

Chelsea McCallum is a Dietitian at Sports and Spinal Physiotherapy. Chelsea is passionate about empowering clients to transform their health and prevent chronic disease. Having graduated with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics from the University of the Sunshine Coast, Chelsea has experience in a wide range of nutrition areas such as weight management, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, malnutrition and sports nutrition. All patients are welcomed including GP referred, NDIS, DVA, Work Cover and privately paying. Chelsea is available for Dietitian appointments online as well as at our Chermside, Woolloongabba, Springfield and North Lakes locations.

 


Tips From Our Dietitian: Lowering LDL Cholesterol

Chelsea is one of our superstar dietitians, and she is passionate about sharing her tips on how to lower bad cholesterol.

Do you screw your nose up at the suggestion of Statins?

You may be surprised to know that you can lower your low-density lipoproteins or ‘bad cholesterol’ with cost-effective and easily accessible products from the supermarket.

Cue, plant sterols!

Plant sterols (phytosterols, phytostanols and their fatty acid esters) are cholesterol-like substances that occur naturally at low levels in fruits, vegetables, nuts and cereals.

Most Australians consume between 150 and 360 milligrams of plant sterols naturally every day, depending on their diet. When eaten in higher amounts, between 2-3 grams per day, plant sterols can naturally reduce LDL cholesterol by inhibiting LDL absorption.

Consuming 2-3g of plant sterols daily is not achievable without therapeutic foods. Available in Australian supermarkets are several options to achieve this dose.

 

Taking into consideration the dose of plant sterols and cost, most patients choose the fortified spreads or Weet-Bix. Unfortunately, the Heart Active milk is the most expensive and provides the smallest dose.

See below fasting types of blood from a patient who took two Cholesterol-Lowering Weet-Bix with fat-reduced milk daily. LDL cholesterol was reduced by 27% in 8 weeks. Of course, we would like to see their LDL cholesterol further. However, this is a great achievement without the addition of Statins. Food for thought.

Meet Chelsea

Chelsea McCallum is a Dietitian at Sports and Spinal Physiotherapy. Chelsea is passionate about empowering clients to transform their health and prevent chronic disease. Having graduated with a Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics from the University of the Sunshine Coast, Chelsea has experience in a wide range of nutrition areas such as weight management, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, malnutrition and sports nutrition. All patients are welcomed including GP referred, NDIS, DVA, Work Cover and privately paying. Chelsea is available for Dietitian appointments online as well as at our Chermside, Woolloongabba, Springfield and North Lakes locations.